What does it cost to self-publish?

The Sunao Publishing services are not free. And if you choose not to use our services, that’s fine; you don’t need to. But self-publishing yourself still isn’t free.

Should you decide to go it alone (as I did the first time), you need to be aware of some of the individual costs in order to accomplish your goal. It’s not that hard really, but you can’t skip any steps… really. Not if you want your book to sell.

This is an article from Reedsy, the all-knowing, all-helpful site for indie authors: click here

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New York Fried reviewed in Publisher’s Weekly

The following review was published in the June 2019 edition of the publishing world’s Bible: Publishers Weekly:

New York Fried

Robert J. Morrow. Sunao International, $15.99 trade paper (474p) ISBN 978-1-540363-23-7

A terrifyingly plausible premise elevates Morrow’s debut and series launch. A new technology, Broadband over Power Lines (BPL), promises to make cable and phone lines redundant by providing internet access at low cost to anyone with electricity. Unbeknownst to President Daniel Emerson, who wants to use BPL to send instant notifications during an emergency, Senator Andre Blais, whose Congressional committee has oversight over BPL, is in bed with the North Koreans, who are plotting to invade the U.S. The North Koreans plan to get access to the BPL system in order to send a destruct signal into America’s power grids. Blais believes that such an attack would “become the catalyst for him to put in place the safeguards necessary” to protect the country. Meanwhile, restauranteur Arthur “Artichoke” Hart, whose restaurant is “one of the CIA’s best equipped offsite meeting places,” is tapped to cater a demonstration of BPL to an international delegation in upstate New York, where, despite his lack of special skills, he ends up playing a key role in trying to foil the diabolical plot. Morrow keeps the action moving, and Hart is an entertaining lead well-positioned to sustain a series. Readers will look forward to his next outing. (BookLife)


Do I need to have a pre-sale period for my book?

Want to know the best time to promote your book?

Before it’s available to be sold.

Savvy authors know that the “pre-sale” period can make or break a title––that it’s not first to market that counts, but best to market. The most successful authors even start developing a strategy for targeting the market before their book is complete. They’re not thinking weeks in advance, but months.

The pre-sale period is so important, in fact, it should be the centerpiece of your book’s marketing and promotional campaign.

Here’s why.  more

Make a plan to write your book

 

Personally,  I struggled as a “pantser” for several drafts of books until I finally read enough books on outlining to become a full-fledged believer in planning a book before you start writing. Our good friends at Bookbaby have some ideas you might find valuable too:

If you don’t know how to write a book, that doesn’t mean you can’t do it. After making a decision — a commitment to share your story — you just need a process and a plan to start writing your book.

Some people are lifelong learners and love the process of going from not knowing anything about a particular subject to being proficient — even an expert. That makes sense. We all want to be the best we can be. But along the way, we have to learn a lot of little things, and that takes time and commitment.

But here’s the deal: I hate the learning curve. I only want to know as much as I need to know to use a tool for my intended purpose. I generally try to find every possible way around studying more than I need to so I can get on to the using stage. Learning frustrates me; knowing satisfies me. But that’s not the way the world works. To know something, I must go through the pain of learning and I have to follow a process. But I can’t even do that if I haven’t first made the decision to try something new and follow through.  more

KIndle Create makes placing images easier

Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) recently announced changes to their publishing program. One of them is placing images in documents which has been a challenge in the past. Here’s their announcement:

“We are excited to announce the availability of Early Access features for Kindle Create. With Early Access you can opt-in to try out pre-release features and provide feedback.
The first Kindle Create Early Access features include:

  1. Image support: Support for sizing and placement of images in your books. You can now insert, resize and delete images in your book and use alignment options to place them in the way that best suits the theme of your book.
  2. Guided View for comics (Windows only): You can now import a PDF Comic book, create panels, specify mask color for Guided view transitions, and preview instantaneously.

You can enable Early Access by following the prompts after you update to Kindle Create 1.7. You can also enable or disable it at any time by going to Settings and once you’ve tried out the feature, you can share your feedback by going to Help->Provide Feedback. Your feedback on Early Access features will help us make improvements before launching these features to all authors.”

A lending library for ebooks

Draft2Digital.com is one of the fastest growing partners in the self-publishing world. Their recent foray into ebook lending is another step in the right direction for authors. In order to participate, just sign up at Draft2Digital.com. Here’s the pitch:

Most public libraries lend ebooks using a practice called One Copy, One User (OCOU). This is just like lending a physical book, in that the library purchases a copy of the ebook, and once a reader checks it out, it has to be returned before another reader can get their hands on it.

That means that unlike a traditional sales channel (such as Kobo or Apple Books), only one reader can discover your book at a time, you only make one sale.

As Draft2Digital expands and improves its library distribution, we’re adding a new option that can help more readers discover your work: Cost Per Checkout (CPC).

CPC allows libraries to have access to the same title for more than one user. Instead of a fixed price, libraries gain access to your books and pay 1/10 of the book’s full purchase price, each time it is loaned out. Unlike OCOU, where only one reader can check your book out at a time and libraries may only purchase a single copy of your book, CPC allows for unlimited checkouts that are paid per use—which can add up quickly!

This allows libraries to take risks on which books to include in their system, increasing the chances of a reader discovering your work, and increasing your revenue opportunities!

You don’t have to worry about turning this on—CPC and OCOU are both enabled by default for library distribution channels, and you are automatically receiving the benefits of both. If you’d prefer to disable CPC, however, you can do so by visiting our new Library Pricing page, or by visiting Advanced User Options on your My Account page.